CrossVersionPerformanceTestRunnerTest.groovy

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Explicit clean up before performance test measurements (#2640)

Previously we were using a workaround where odd runs were removed from measurements, and executed a `clean` build instead of the measured build.

Performance tests can now specify `cleanTasks`, similar to how they specify `tasksToRun`. These `cleanTasks` will be executed before each run (warm-up and measurement runs alike).

A new column is added to performance test tables to track this new information. It is a nullable column to allow for test results added by older versions of Gradle.

I've updated the task output caching tests and the Maven vs. Gradle comparisons to declare `cleanTasks` instead of the old hack with the odd-even runs.

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Add host name to performance test results

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Fail performance tests if build under test fails

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Remove memory measurement APIs

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Simplify performance measurements

The many measurements that we injected into the build under test were

skewing our measurements to the point of making them unreliable or

unrealistic. We now only measure end to end build time. Here's a breakdown

with the rationale for removing each other measurement:

- configuration time: can be done by having a `gradle help` scenario instead

- execution time: the user does not care whether a long build is stuck in execution or configuration

- setup/teardown: was ill-defined anyway, basically total - configuration - execution

- JIT compile time: this is nothing we can influence and thus pointless to measure

- Memory usage: Was only measured at one point in the build, which doesn't tell us anything about

any problems at any other point in the build

- GC CPU time: If this increases we'd see it in total execution time

Generally, looking at the graphs has never pointed us directly at the problem, we always need to

profile anyway. So instead of skewing our measurements with lots of profling code, we should

instead use a dedicated profiling job to measure if we actually see a regression.

Memory usage can be tested indirectly by giving each scenario a reasonable amount of memory.

If memory usage rises above that reasonable limit, we'd see execution time rise, telling us about

the regression. Generally, we do not optimize for smallest memory usage, but for fastest execution

with reasonable memory overhead.

This change also removes all JVM tweaking and wait periods which we introduced in an attempt to

make tests more predictable and stable. These tweaks have not really helped us achieve more stable

tests and have often done the opposite. They also add lots of complexity and make our tests more

unrealistic. A real users will not add all these JVM options to Gradle.

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Use baseVersion consistently

Note that versionBase from the build-receipt.properties is

only used in `incoming-distributions.gradle`.

PR #798

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Set JVM options for daemon client in performance tests

- optimize for stable results

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Wire integration test build context instance

- enables using performance test specific build context when an instance

is properly wired

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Make '--baselines none' work again

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Ignored a couple of tests.

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Make it possible to generate flame graphs during performance tests

This commit improves the integration of Honest Profiler by making it possible to post-process the log files and generate a flame graph.

For this to be possible, the `org.gradle.performance.honestprofiler` system property must be set to a directory where flame graphs will

be exported.

It is expected to find 2 environment variables:

- `HP_HOME_DIR` must point to a valid Honest Profiler installation (https://github.com/RichardWarburton/honest-profiler)

- `FG_HOME_DIR` must point to a valid FlameGraph installation (https://github.com/brendangregg/FlameGraph)

In case those are not set, the collector will try to find them in `~/tools/honest-profiler` and `~/tools/FlameGraph` respectively.

The graphs are *not* integrated into the performance reports yet.

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Make it possible to generate flame graphs during performance tests

This commit improves the integration of Honest Profiler by making it possible to post-process the log files and generate a flame graph.

For this to be possible, the `org.gradle.performance.honestprofiler` system property must be set to a directory where flame graphs will

be exported.

It is expected to find 2 environment variables:

- `HP_HOME_DIR` must point to a valid Honest Profiler installation (https://github.com/RichardWarburton/honest-profiler)

- `FG_HOME_DIR` must point to a valid FlameGraph installation (https://github.com/brendangregg/FlameGraph)

In case those are not set, the collector will try to find them in `~/tools/honest-profiler` and `~/tools/FlameGraph` respectively.

The graphs are *not* integrated into the performance reports yet.

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Polish CrossVersionPerformanceTestRunner

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Add support for --baselines none

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Fix tests

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Allow leaving targetVersions unspecified

- it's faster to do profiling when running only the current version

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Split test so that each perf run has a different directory

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Reintroduce gradle/gradle@784d747

- There was previously a concern that this would break the

BuildScansPerformanceTest, but that test doesn't actually use the

BaselineVersion class at all.

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Revert "Make strict performance testing default."

This reverts commit 784d7476556e63c8d7f15919ae9875c3b7181aa3.

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Make strict performance testing default.

- This makes it impossible to set maximum regression limits manually and

defaults to using a statistically derived allowable amount of

variance.

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Allow usage of snapshot versions in performance test baselines

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Allow to specify which regressions to look for from command line

This commit introduces a new flag (`--checks`) or system property (`org.gradle.performance.execution.checks`)

that can be used to control which regressions are going to be looked for in a performance test. By default,

we're looking for regressions in memory and speed. With this flag it is possible to control precisely what

to look for:

- `all` is the default and will look for both memory and speed regressions

- `memory` will only check for memory regressions

- `speed` will only check for speed regressions

- `none` will not check for regressions

The `memory` and `speed` values are useful when bisecting a regression: they let us ignore potential statistical

artifacts of measurement of a category we're not interested in.

The `none` value is interesting for historical builds, where we want to collect all measurements, but not

fail the build if a regression is encountered.

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Fix CodeNarc

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Support `defaults` in `--baselines` parameter

If `defaults` is found in the list of versions in `baselines`, it is automatically expanded to the original list of baseline versions.

This is done so that we can use the `--baselines` parameter in anycase from TeamCity, whether we want to override the original list

of versions or not. If we don't, then we can set the `defaults` value and still run the build.

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Allow specifying the list of baselines from command line

This commit introduces the ability to set the list of baseline versions for performance tests through a command-line

flag (`--baselines`) or a system property (`org.gradle.performance.baselines`). The list must be specified as a

comma-separated list of versions or as a semicolon separated list of versions.

Two versions are handled particularly:

* `last` corresponds to the last release of Gradle

* `nightly` corresponds to the latest build of Gradle (`master` branch)

This commit also removes the "ad-hoc" mode for executing tests. The idea is to replace it with this flag, which

can be set to `nightly`. However, the "ad-hoc" mode skipped writing results to the database, in order to avoid

polluting the performance results DB with tests. If you want to do this, you need to set the `gradle.performance.db.url`

to a local, temporary database:

```

./gradlew cleanSmallOldJava smallOldJava cleanPerformanceTest performanceTest --scenarios 'clean Java build smallOldJava (daemon)' -x prepareSamples --baselines nightly -Porg.gradle.performance.db.url=jdbc:h2:./build/database

```

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Don't add MaxPermSize param on Java 8+ for running perf tests

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Execute performance test scenarios on a fresh working copy

Reusing whatever state the last test left behind can make performance

seem better (because of preexisting caches) or worse (because of lots of output).

This makes the results dependent on the order in which the tests are executed.

It also prevented us from using incremental build for the project templates.

We now create a fresh copy of the template project for each test run,

fixing both of these problems at once.

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Fix unit test

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Move all result-related classes to org.gradle.performance.results

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Extract performance test fixtures to separate project

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