IvyDependencyDescriptorTest.groovy

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Revert new exclude rule merging

This is a temporary revert to allow ironing out some issues with

the newer implementation.

    • -16
    • +13
    ./IvyDependencyDescriptorTest.groovy
  1. … 38 more files in changeset.
Revert new exclude rule merging

This is a temporary revert to allow ironing out some more issues with

the newer implementation.

    • -16
    • +13
    ./IvyDependencyDescriptorTest.groovy
  1. … 38 more files in changeset.
Revert new exclude rule merging

This is a temporary revert to allow ironing out some issues with

the newer implementation.

    • -16
    • +13
    ./IvyDependencyDescriptorTest.groovy
  1. … 38 more files in changeset.
Do not share exclusion cache

For some reason (that I'm obviously not smart enough to figure out),

we can't share the exclusion cache for the whole build, because even

if its safe, resolution is sensitive to the order of entries in

the cache.

  1. … 5 more files in changeset.
Do not share exclusion cache

For some reason (that I'm obviously not smart enough to figure out),

we can't share the exclusion cache for the whole build, because even

if its safe, resolution is sensitive to the order of entries in

the cache.

  1. … 5 more files in changeset.
Rework algorithm

  1. … 72 more files in changeset.
Rework exclude rule merging

As a follow-up to #9197, this commit properly fixes the

exclude rule merging algorithm, by completely rewriting

it. The new merging algorithm works by implementing the

minimal set of algebra operations that make sense to

minimize computation durations. In order to do this,

this commit introduces a number of exclude specs

(found in their own package) and factories to create

actual implementation of those specs.

Specs represent the different kind of excludes we can

find:

- excluding a group

- excluding a module (no group defined)

- excluding a group+module

- excluding an artifact of a group+module

- pattern-matching excludes

- unions of excludes

- intersections of excludes

With all those minimal bricks, factories are responsible

of generating consistent specs. The dumbest factory

will just generate new instances for everything. This

is the default factory.

Minimally, this factory has to be backed by an optimizing

factory, which will take care of handling special cases:

- union or intersection of a single spec

- union or intersection of 2 specs

- when one of them is null

- when both are equal

Then we have a factory which performs the minimal algebra

to minimize specs:

- unions of unions

- intersections of intersections

- union of a union and individual specs

- insection of an intersection and individual spec

- ...

This factory can be as smart as it can, but one must be

careful that it's worth it: some previously implemented

optimizations (like (A+B).A = A turned out to be costly

to detect, and didn't make it the final cut.

Yet another factory is there to reduce the memory footprint

and, as a side effect, make things faster by interning

the specs: equivalent specs are interned and indexed, which

allows us to optimize unions and intersections of specs.

Last but not least, a caching factory is there to avoid

recomputing the same intersections and unions of specs

when we have already done the job. This is efficient if

the underlying (delegate) specs are easily compared,

which is the case thanks to the interning factory.

All in all, the delegation chain allows us to make

the algorithm fast and hopefully reliable, while

making it easier to debug.

    • -13
    • +16
    ./IvyDependencyDescriptorTest.groovy
  1. … 90 more files in changeset.
Rework exclude rule merging

As a follow-up to #9197, this commit properly fixes the

exclude rule merging algorithm, by completely rewriting

it. The new merging algorithm works by implementing the

minimal set of algebra operations that make sense to

minimize computation durations. In order to do this,

this commit introduces a number of exclude specs

(found in their own package) and factories to create

actual implementation of those specs.

Specs represent the different kind of excludes we can

find:

- excluding a group

- excluding a module (no group defined)

- excluding a group+module

- excluding an artifact of a group+module

- pattern-matching excludes

- unions of excludes

- intersections of excludes

With all those minimal bricks, factories are responsible

of generating consistent specs. The dumbest factory

will just generate new instances for everything. This

is the default factory.

Minimally, this factory has to be backed by an optimizing

factory, which will take care of handling special cases:

- union or intersection of a single spec

- union or intersection of 2 specs

- when one of them is null

- when both are equal

Then we have a factory which performs the minimal algebra

to minimize specs:

- unions of unions

- intersections of intersections

- union of a union and individual specs

- insection of an intersection and individual spec

- ...

This factory can be as smart as it can, but one must be

careful that it's worth it: some previously implemented

optimizations (like (A+B).A = A turned out to be costly

to detect, and didn't make it the final cut.

Last but not least, a caching factory is there to avoid

recomputing the same intersections and unions of specs

when we have already done the job. This is efficient if

the underlying (delegate) specs are easily compared,

which is the case thanks to the interning factory.

All in all, the delegation chain allows us to make

the algorithm fast and hopefully reliable, while

making it easier to debug.

    • -13
    • +16
    ./IvyDependencyDescriptorTest.groovy
  1. … 75 more files in changeset.
Rework exclude rule merging

As a follow-up to #9197, this commit properly fixes the

exclude rule merging algorithm, by completely rewriting

it. The new merging algorithm works by implementing the

minimal set of algebra operations that make sense to

minimize computation durations. In order to do this,

this commit introduces a number of exclude specs

(found in their own package) and factories to create

actual implementation of those specs.

Specs represent the different kind of excludes we can

find:

- excluding a group

- excluding a module (no group defined)

- excluding a group+module

- excluding an artifact of a group+module

- pattern-matching excludes

- unions of excludes

- intersections of excludes

With all those minimal bricks, factories are responsible

of generating consistent specs. The dumbest factory

will just generate new instances for everything. This

is the default factory.

Minimally, this factory has to be backed by an optimizing

factory, which will take care of handling special cases:

- union or intersection of a single spec

- union or intersection of 2 specs

- when one of them is null

- when both are equal

Then we have a factory which performs the minimal algebra

to minimize specs:

- unions of unions

- intersections of intersections

- union of a union and individual specs

- insection of an intersection and individual spec

- ...

This factory can be as smart as it can, but one must be

careful that it's worth it: some previously implemented

optimizations (like (A+B).A = A turned out to be costly

to detect, and didn't make it the final cut.

Yet another factory is there to reduce the memory footprint

and, as a side effect, make things faster by interning

the specs: equivalent specs are interned and indexed, which

allows us to optimize unions and intersections of specs.

Last but not least, a caching factory is there to avoid

recomputing the same intersections and unions of specs

when we have already done the job. This is efficient if

the underlying (delegate) specs are easily compared,

which is the case thanks to the interning factory.

All in all, the delegation chain allows us to make

the algorithm fast and hopefully reliable, while

making it easier to debug.

    • -13
    • +16
    ./IvyDependencyDescriptorTest.groovy
  1. … 91 more files in changeset.
Rework exclude rule merging

As a follow-up to #9197, this commit properly fixes the

exclude rule merging algorithm, by completely rewriting

it. The new merging algorithm works by implementing the

minimal set of algebra operations that make sense to

minimize computation durations. In order to do this,

this commit introduces a number of exclude specs

(found in their own package) and factories to create

actual implementation of those specs.

Specs represent the different kind of excludes we can

find:

- excluding a group

- excluding a module (no group defined)

- excluding a group+module

- excluding an artifact of a group+module

- pattern-matching excludes

- unions of excludes

- intersections of excludes

With all those minimal bricks, factories are responsible

of generating consistent specs. The dumbest factory

will just generate new instances for everything. This

is the default factory.

Minimally, this factory has to be backed by an optimizing

factory, which will take care of handling special cases:

- union or intersection of a single spec

- union or intersection of 2 specs

- when one of them is null

- when both are equal

Then we have a factory which performs the minimal algebra

to minimize specs:

- unions of unions

- intersections of intersections

- union of a union and individual specs

- insection of an intersection and individual spec

- ...

This factory can be as smart as it can, but one must be

careful that it's worth it: some previously implemented

optimizations (like (A+B).A = A turned out to be costly

to detect, and didn't make it the final cut.

Yet another factory is there to reduce the memory footprint

and, as a side effect, make things faster by interning

the specs: equivalent specs are interned and indexed, which

allows us to optimize unions and intersections of specs.

Last but not least, a caching factory is there to avoid

recomputing the same intersections and unions of specs

when we have already done the job. This is efficient if

the underlying (delegate) specs are easily compared,

which is the case thanks to the interning factory.

All in all, the delegation chain allows us to make

the algorithm fast and hopefully reliable, while

making it easier to debug.

    • -13
    • +16
    ./IvyDependencyDescriptorTest.groovy
  1. … 90 more files in changeset.
Rework exclude rule merging

As a follow-up to #9197, this commit properly fixes the

exclude rule merging algorithm, by completely rewriting

it. The new merging algorithm works by implementing the

minimal set of algebra operations that make sense to

minimize computation durations. In order to do this,

this commit introduces a number of exclude specs

(found in their own package) and factories to create

actual implementation of those specs.

Specs represent the different kind of excludes we can

find:

- excluding a group

- excluding a module (no group defined)

- excluding a group+module

- excluding an artifact of a group+module

- pattern-matching excludes

- unions of excludes

- intersections of excludes

With all those minimal bricks, factories are responsible

of generating consistent specs. The dumbest factory

will just generate new instances for everything. This

is the default factory.

Minimally, this factory has to be backed by an optimizing

factory, which will take care of handling special cases:

- union or intersection of a single spec

- union or intersection of 2 specs

- when one of them is null

- when both are equal

Then we have a factory which performs the minimal algebra

to minimize specs:

- unions of unions

- intersections of intersections

- union of a union and individual specs

- insection of an intersection and individual spec

- ...

This factory can be as smart as it can, but one must be

careful that it's worth it: some previously implemented

optimizations (like (A+B).A = A turned out to be costly

to detect, and didn't make it the final cut.

Last but not least, a caching factory is there to avoid

recomputing the same intersections and unions of specs

when we have already done the job. This is efficient if

the underlying (delegate) specs are easily compared,

which is the case thanks to the interning factory.

All in all, the delegation chain allows us to make

the algorithm fast and hopefully reliable, while

making it easier to debug.

    • -13
    • +16
    ./IvyDependencyDescriptorTest.groovy
  1. … 75 more files in changeset.
Rework exclude rule merging

As a follow-up to #9197, this commit properly fixes the

exclude rule merging algorithm, by completely rewriting

it. The new merging algorithm works by implementing the

minimal set of algebra operations that make sense to

minimize computation durations. In order to do this,

this commit introduces a number of exclude specs

(found in their own package) and factories to create

actual implementation of those specs.

Specs represent the different kind of excludes we can

find:

- excluding a group

- excluding a module (no group defined)

- excluding a group+module

- excluding an artifact of a group+module

- pattern-matching excludes

- unions of excludes

- intersections of excludes

With all those minimal bricks, factories are responsible

of generating consistent specs. The dumbest factory

will just generate new instances for everything. This

is the default factory.

Minimally, this factory has to be backed by an optimizing

factory, which will take care of handling special cases:

- union or intersection of a single spec

- union or intersection of 2 specs

- when one of them is null

- when both are equal

Then we have a factory which performs the minimal algebra

to minimize specs:

- unions of unions

- intersections of intersections

- union of a union and individual specs

- insection of an intersection and individual spec

- ...

This factory can be as smart as it can, but one must be

careful that it's worth it: some previously implemented

optimizations (like (A+B).A = A turned out to be costly

to detect, and didn't make it the final cut.

Last but not least, a caching factory is there to avoid

recomputing the same intersections and unions of specs

when we have already done the job. This is efficient if

the underlying (delegate) specs are easily compared,

which is the case thanks to the interning factory.

All in all, the delegation chain allows us to make

the algorithm fast and hopefully reliable, while

making it easier to debug.

    • -13
    • +16
    ./IvyDependencyDescriptorTest.groovy
  1. … 75 more files in changeset.
Rework exclude rule merging

As a follow-up to #9197, this commit properly fixes the

exclude rule merging algorithm, by completely rewriting

it. The new merging algorithm works by implementing the

minimal set of algebra operations that make sense to

minimize computation durations. In order to do this,

this commit introduces a number of exclude specs

(found in their own package) and factories to create

actual implementation of those specs.

Specs represent the different kind of excludes we can

find:

- excluding a group

- excluding a module (no group defined)

- excluding a group+module

- excluding an artifact of a group+module

- pattern-matching excludes

- unions of excludes

- intersections of excludes

With all those minimal bricks, factories are responsible

of generating consistent specs. The dumbest factory

will just generate new instances for everything. This

is the default factory.

Minimally, this factory has to be backed by an optimizing

factory, which will take care of handling special cases:

- union or intersection of a single spec

- union or intersection of 2 specs

- when one of them is null

- when both are equal

Then we have a factory which performs the minimal algebra

to minimize specs:

- unions of unions

- intersections of intersections

- union of a union and individual specs

- insection of an intersection and individual spec

- ...

This factory can be as smart as it can, but one must be

careful that it's worth it: some previously implemented

optimizations (like (A+B).A = A turned out to be costly

to detect, and didn't make it the final cut.

Yet another factory is there to reduce the memory footprint

and, as a side effect, make things faster by interning

the specs: equivalent specs are interned and indexed, which

allows us to optimize unions and intersections of specs.

Last but not least, a caching factory is there to avoid

recomputing the same intersections and unions of specs

when we have already done the job. This is efficient if

the underlying (delegate) specs are easily compared,

which is the case thanks to the interning factory.

All in all, the delegation chain allows us to make

the algorithm fast and hopefully reliable, while

making it easier to debug.

    • -13
    • +16
    ./IvyDependencyDescriptorTest.groovy
  1. … 90 more files in changeset.
Rework exclude rule merging

As a follow-up to #9197, this commit properly fixes the

exclude rule merging algorithm, by completely rewriting

it. The new merging algorithm works by implementing the

minimal set of algebra operations that make sense to

minimize computation durations. In order to do this,

this commit introduces a number of exclude specs

(found in their own package) and factories to create

actual implementation of those specs.

Specs represent the different kind of excludes we can

find:

- excluding a group

- excluding a module (no group defined)

- excluding a group+module

- excluding an artifact of a group+module

- pattern-matching excludes

- unions of excludes

- intersections of excludes

With all those minimal bricks, factories are responsible

of generating consistent specs. The dumbest factory

will just generate new instances for everything. This

is the default factory.

Minimally, this factory has to be backed by an optimizing

factory, which will take care of handling special cases:

- union or intersection of a single spec

- union or intersection of 2 specs

- when one of them is null

- when both are equal

Then we have a factory which performs the minimal algebra

to minimize specs:

- unions of unions

- intersections of intersections

- union of a union and individual specs

- insection of an intersection and individual spec

- ...

This factory can be as smart as it can, but one must be

careful that it's worth it: some previously implemented

optimizations (like (A+B).A = A turned out to be costly

to detect, and didn't make it the final cut.

Yet another factory is there to reduce the memory footprint

and, as a side effect, make things faster by interning

the specs: equivalent specs are interned and indexed, which

allows us to optimize unions and intersections of specs.

Last but not least, a caching factory is there to avoid

recomputing the same intersections and unions of specs

when we have already done the job. This is efficient if

the underlying (delegate) specs are easily compared,

which is the case thanks to the interning factory.

All in all, the delegation chain allows us to make

the algorithm fast and hopefully reliable, while

making it easier to debug.

    • -13
    • +16
    ./IvyDependencyDescriptorTest.groovy
  1. … 90 more files in changeset.
Rework exclude rule merging

As a follow-up to #9197, this commit properly fixes the

exclude rule merging algorithm, by completely rewriting

it. The new merging algorithm works by implementing the

minimal set of algebra operations that make sense to

minimize computation durations. In order to do this,

this commit introduces a number of exclude specs

(found in their own package) and factories to create

actual implementation of those specs.

Specs represent the different kind of excludes we can

find:

- excluding a group

- excluding a module (no group defined)

- excluding a group+module

- excluding an artifact of a group+module

- pattern-matching excludes

- unions of excludes

- intersections of excludes

With all those minimal bricks, factories are responsible

of generating consistent specs. The dumbest factory

will just generate new instances for everything. This

is the default factory.

Minimally, this factory has to be backed by an optimizing

factory, which will take care of handling special cases:

- union or intersection of a single spec

- union or intersection of 2 specs

- when one of them is null

- when both are equal

Then we have a factory which performs the minimal algebra

to minimize specs:

- unions of unions

- intersections of intersections

- union of a union and individual specs

- insection of an intersection and individual spec

- ...

This factory can be as smart as it can, but one must be

careful that it's worth it: some previously implemented

optimizations (like (A+B).A = A turned out to be costly

to detect, and didn't make it the final cut.

Yet another factory is there to reduce the memory footprint

and, as a side effect, make things faster by interning

the specs: equivalent specs are interned and indexed, which

allows us to optimize unions and intersections of specs.

Last but not least, a caching factory is there to avoid

recomputing the same intersections and unions of specs

when we have already done the job. This is efficient if

the underlying (delegate) specs are easily compared,

which is the case thanks to the interning factory.

All in all, the delegation chain allows us to make

the algorithm fast and hopefully reliable, while

making it easier to debug.

    • -13
    • +16
    ./IvyDependencyDescriptorTest.groovy
  1. … 90 more files in changeset.
Rework exclude rule merging

As a follow-up to #9197, this commit properly fixes the

exclude rule merging algorithm, by completely rewriting

it. The new merging algorithm works by implementing the

minimal set of algebra operations that make sense to

minimize computation durations. In order to do this,

this commit introduces a number of exclude specs

(found in their own package) and factories to create

actual implementation of those specs.

Specs represent the different kind of excludes we can

find:

- excluding a group

- excluding a module (no group defined)

- excluding a group+module

- excluding an artifact of a group+module

- pattern-matching excludes

- unions of excludes

- intersections of excludes

With all those minimal bricks, factories are responsible

of generating consistent specs. The dumbest factory

will just generate new instances for everything. This

is the default factory.

Minimally, this factory has to be backed by an optimizing

factory, which will take care of handling special cases:

- union or intersection of a single spec

- union or intersection of 2 specs

- when one of them is null

- when both are equal

Then we have a factory which performs the minimal algebra

to minimize specs:

- unions of unions

- intersections of intersections

- union of a union and individual specs

- insection of an intersection and individual spec

- ...

This factory can be as smart as it can, but one must be

careful that it's worth it: some previously implemented

optimizations (like (A+B).A = A turned out to be costly

to detect, and didn't make it the final cut.

Yet another factory is there to reduce the memory footprint

and, as a side effect, make things faster by interning

the specs: equivalent specs are interned and indexed, which

allows us to optimize unions and intersections of specs.

Last but not least, a caching factory is there to avoid

recomputing the same intersections and unions of specs

when we have already done the job. This is efficient if

the underlying (delegate) specs are easily compared,

which is the case thanks to the interning factory.

All in all, the delegation chain allows us to make

the algorithm fast and hopefully reliable, while

making it easier to debug.

    • -13
    • +16
    ./IvyDependencyDescriptorTest.groovy
  1. … 90 more files in changeset.
Move all infrastructure to the new exclude merging package

The old package is still here and will be removed in a subsequent commit.

    • -13
    • +16
    ./IvyDependencyDescriptorTest.groovy
  1. … 18 more files in changeset.
Use an `ImmutableSet` to represent the configuration hierarchy

ImmutableSets are ordered and optimized for lookups. We happen to

call `contains` a lot on hierarchies, so using a `Set` should

optimize things a little.

    • -23
    • +24
    ./IvyDependencyDescriptorTest.groovy
  1. … 31 more files in changeset.
Refactor ModuleResolveMetadata

Reorganize code in packages, move serialization related code closer to

classes to reduce need of public methods.

  1. … 79 more files in changeset.
Refactor ModuleResolveMetadata

Reorganize code in packages, move serialization related code closer to

classes to reduce need of public methods.

  1. … 79 more files in changeset.
Rename id accessors for consistency

Use `ComponentIdentifier getId()`

Use `ModuleVersionIdentifier getModuleVersionId()`

  1. … 67 more files in changeset.
De-duplicate target confs selected by Ivy dependency

For a dependency declared in an Ivy descriptor file, one or more

target configurations will be chosen for the selected component,

based on the 'confMapping' attribute of the dependency.

In some cases, one chosen configuration may be extended by another

chosen configuration, rendering the first configuration redundant.

With this change, these redundant configurations are removed from

the resolution result.

There is a breaking change here, in that the 'resolved configuration'

resolution result will contain fewer configuration nodes. It will

still contain the same modules and artifacts, in the same order.

A similar change was made for Maven modules in 9df4ba294cd39aff3b55bbe402bb7b7870a24bf4.

    • -6
    • +11
    ./IvyDependencyDescriptorTest.groovy
  1. … 4 more files in changeset.
Move logic that decides to do attribute matching out of ExternalDependencyDescriptor

    • -47
    • +22
    ./IvyDependencyDescriptorTest.groovy
  1. … 3 more files in changeset.
Renamed `DefaultDependencyMetadata` -> `ExternalDependencyDescriptor`

This type now represents the external representation of a dependency, not the

internal `DependencyMetadata`. Also renamed and polished Ivy/Maven subtypes.

    • -0
    • +464
    ./IvyDependencyDescriptorTest.groovy
  1. … 34 more files in changeset.