DefaultModuleExclusionTest.groovy

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Revert new exclude rule merging

This is a temporary revert to allow ironing out some issues with

the newer implementation.

    • -0
    • +818
    ./DefaultModuleExclusionTest.groovy
  1. … 38 more files in changeset.
Revert new exclude rule merging

This is a temporary revert to allow ironing out some more issues with

the newer implementation.

    • -0
    • +818
    ./DefaultModuleExclusionTest.groovy
  1. … 38 more files in changeset.
Revert new exclude rule merging

This is a temporary revert to allow ironing out some issues with

the newer implementation.

    • -0
    • +818
    ./DefaultModuleExclusionTest.groovy
  1. … 38 more files in changeset.
Rework exclude rule merging

As a follow-up to #9197, this commit properly fixes the

exclude rule merging algorithm, by completely rewriting

it. The new merging algorithm works by implementing the

minimal set of algebra operations that make sense to

minimize computation durations. In order to do this,

this commit introduces a number of exclude specs

(found in their own package) and factories to create

actual implementation of those specs.

Specs represent the different kind of excludes we can

find:

- excluding a group

- excluding a module (no group defined)

- excluding a group+module

- excluding an artifact of a group+module

- pattern-matching excludes

- unions of excludes

- intersections of excludes

With all those minimal bricks, factories are responsible

of generating consistent specs. The dumbest factory

will just generate new instances for everything. This

is the default factory.

Minimally, this factory has to be backed by an optimizing

factory, which will take care of handling special cases:

- union or intersection of a single spec

- union or intersection of 2 specs

- when one of them is null

- when both are equal

Then we have a factory which performs the minimal algebra

to minimize specs:

- unions of unions

- intersections of intersections

- union of a union and individual specs

- insection of an intersection and individual spec

- ...

This factory can be as smart as it can, but one must be

careful that it's worth it: some previously implemented

optimizations (like (A+B).A = A turned out to be costly

to detect, and didn't make it the final cut.

Yet another factory is there to reduce the memory footprint

and, as a side effect, make things faster by interning

the specs: equivalent specs are interned and indexed, which

allows us to optimize unions and intersections of specs.

Last but not least, a caching factory is there to avoid

recomputing the same intersections and unions of specs

when we have already done the job. This is efficient if

the underlying (delegate) specs are easily compared,

which is the case thanks to the interning factory.

All in all, the delegation chain allows us to make

the algorithm fast and hopefully reliable, while

making it easier to debug.

    • -818
    • +0
    ./DefaultModuleExclusionTest.groovy
  1. … 90 more files in changeset.
Rework exclude rule merging

As a follow-up to #9197, this commit properly fixes the

exclude rule merging algorithm, by completely rewriting

it. The new merging algorithm works by implementing the

minimal set of algebra operations that make sense to

minimize computation durations. In order to do this,

this commit introduces a number of exclude specs

(found in their own package) and factories to create

actual implementation of those specs.

Specs represent the different kind of excludes we can

find:

- excluding a group

- excluding a module (no group defined)

- excluding a group+module

- excluding an artifact of a group+module

- pattern-matching excludes

- unions of excludes

- intersections of excludes

With all those minimal bricks, factories are responsible

of generating consistent specs. The dumbest factory

will just generate new instances for everything. This

is the default factory.

Minimally, this factory has to be backed by an optimizing

factory, which will take care of handling special cases:

- union or intersection of a single spec

- union or intersection of 2 specs

- when one of them is null

- when both are equal

Then we have a factory which performs the minimal algebra

to minimize specs:

- unions of unions

- intersections of intersections

- union of a union and individual specs

- insection of an intersection and individual spec

- ...

This factory can be as smart as it can, but one must be

careful that it's worth it: some previously implemented

optimizations (like (A+B).A = A turned out to be costly

to detect, and didn't make it the final cut.

Last but not least, a caching factory is there to avoid

recomputing the same intersections and unions of specs

when we have already done the job. This is efficient if

the underlying (delegate) specs are easily compared,

which is the case thanks to the interning factory.

All in all, the delegation chain allows us to make

the algorithm fast and hopefully reliable, while

making it easier to debug.

    • -818
    • +0
    ./DefaultModuleExclusionTest.groovy
  1. … 75 more files in changeset.
Rework exclude rule merging

As a follow-up to #9197, this commit properly fixes the

exclude rule merging algorithm, by completely rewriting

it. The new merging algorithm works by implementing the

minimal set of algebra operations that make sense to

minimize computation durations. In order to do this,

this commit introduces a number of exclude specs

(found in their own package) and factories to create

actual implementation of those specs.

Specs represent the different kind of excludes we can

find:

- excluding a group

- excluding a module (no group defined)

- excluding a group+module

- excluding an artifact of a group+module

- pattern-matching excludes

- unions of excludes

- intersections of excludes

With all those minimal bricks, factories are responsible

of generating consistent specs. The dumbest factory

will just generate new instances for everything. This

is the default factory.

Minimally, this factory has to be backed by an optimizing

factory, which will take care of handling special cases:

- union or intersection of a single spec

- union or intersection of 2 specs

- when one of them is null

- when both are equal

Then we have a factory which performs the minimal algebra

to minimize specs:

- unions of unions

- intersections of intersections

- union of a union and individual specs

- insection of an intersection and individual spec

- ...

This factory can be as smart as it can, but one must be

careful that it's worth it: some previously implemented

optimizations (like (A+B).A = A turned out to be costly

to detect, and didn't make it the final cut.

Yet another factory is there to reduce the memory footprint

and, as a side effect, make things faster by interning

the specs: equivalent specs are interned and indexed, which

allows us to optimize unions and intersections of specs.

Last but not least, a caching factory is there to avoid

recomputing the same intersections and unions of specs

when we have already done the job. This is efficient if

the underlying (delegate) specs are easily compared,

which is the case thanks to the interning factory.

All in all, the delegation chain allows us to make

the algorithm fast and hopefully reliable, while

making it easier to debug.

    • -818
    • +0
    ./DefaultModuleExclusionTest.groovy
  1. … 91 more files in changeset.
Rework exclude rule merging

As a follow-up to #9197, this commit properly fixes the

exclude rule merging algorithm, by completely rewriting

it. The new merging algorithm works by implementing the

minimal set of algebra operations that make sense to

minimize computation durations. In order to do this,

this commit introduces a number of exclude specs

(found in their own package) and factories to create

actual implementation of those specs.

Specs represent the different kind of excludes we can

find:

- excluding a group

- excluding a module (no group defined)

- excluding a group+module

- excluding an artifact of a group+module

- pattern-matching excludes

- unions of excludes

- intersections of excludes

With all those minimal bricks, factories are responsible

of generating consistent specs. The dumbest factory

will just generate new instances for everything. This

is the default factory.

Minimally, this factory has to be backed by an optimizing

factory, which will take care of handling special cases:

- union or intersection of a single spec

- union or intersection of 2 specs

- when one of them is null

- when both are equal

Then we have a factory which performs the minimal algebra

to minimize specs:

- unions of unions

- intersections of intersections

- union of a union and individual specs

- insection of an intersection and individual spec

- ...

This factory can be as smart as it can, but one must be

careful that it's worth it: some previously implemented

optimizations (like (A+B).A = A turned out to be costly

to detect, and didn't make it the final cut.

Yet another factory is there to reduce the memory footprint

and, as a side effect, make things faster by interning

the specs: equivalent specs are interned and indexed, which

allows us to optimize unions and intersections of specs.

Last but not least, a caching factory is there to avoid

recomputing the same intersections and unions of specs

when we have already done the job. This is efficient if

the underlying (delegate) specs are easily compared,

which is the case thanks to the interning factory.

All in all, the delegation chain allows us to make

the algorithm fast and hopefully reliable, while

making it easier to debug.

    • -818
    • +0
    ./DefaultModuleExclusionTest.groovy
  1. … 90 more files in changeset.
Rework exclude rule merging

As a follow-up to #9197, this commit properly fixes the

exclude rule merging algorithm, by completely rewriting

it. The new merging algorithm works by implementing the

minimal set of algebra operations that make sense to

minimize computation durations. In order to do this,

this commit introduces a number of exclude specs

(found in their own package) and factories to create

actual implementation of those specs.

Specs represent the different kind of excludes we can

find:

- excluding a group

- excluding a module (no group defined)

- excluding a group+module

- excluding an artifact of a group+module

- pattern-matching excludes

- unions of excludes

- intersections of excludes

With all those minimal bricks, factories are responsible

of generating consistent specs. The dumbest factory

will just generate new instances for everything. This

is the default factory.

Minimally, this factory has to be backed by an optimizing

factory, which will take care of handling special cases:

- union or intersection of a single spec

- union or intersection of 2 specs

- when one of them is null

- when both are equal

Then we have a factory which performs the minimal algebra

to minimize specs:

- unions of unions

- intersections of intersections

- union of a union and individual specs

- insection of an intersection and individual spec

- ...

This factory can be as smart as it can, but one must be

careful that it's worth it: some previously implemented

optimizations (like (A+B).A = A turned out to be costly

to detect, and didn't make it the final cut.

Last but not least, a caching factory is there to avoid

recomputing the same intersections and unions of specs

when we have already done the job. This is efficient if

the underlying (delegate) specs are easily compared,

which is the case thanks to the interning factory.

All in all, the delegation chain allows us to make

the algorithm fast and hopefully reliable, while

making it easier to debug.

    • -818
    • +0
    ./DefaultModuleExclusionTest.groovy
  1. … 75 more files in changeset.
Rework exclude rule merging

As a follow-up to #9197, this commit properly fixes the

exclude rule merging algorithm, by completely rewriting

it. The new merging algorithm works by implementing the

minimal set of algebra operations that make sense to

minimize computation durations. In order to do this,

this commit introduces a number of exclude specs

(found in their own package) and factories to create

actual implementation of those specs.

Specs represent the different kind of excludes we can

find:

- excluding a group

- excluding a module (no group defined)

- excluding a group+module

- excluding an artifact of a group+module

- pattern-matching excludes

- unions of excludes

- intersections of excludes

With all those minimal bricks, factories are responsible

of generating consistent specs. The dumbest factory

will just generate new instances for everything. This

is the default factory.

Minimally, this factory has to be backed by an optimizing

factory, which will take care of handling special cases:

- union or intersection of a single spec

- union or intersection of 2 specs

- when one of them is null

- when both are equal

Then we have a factory which performs the minimal algebra

to minimize specs:

- unions of unions

- intersections of intersections

- union of a union and individual specs

- insection of an intersection and individual spec

- ...

This factory can be as smart as it can, but one must be

careful that it's worth it: some previously implemented

optimizations (like (A+B).A = A turned out to be costly

to detect, and didn't make it the final cut.

Last but not least, a caching factory is there to avoid

recomputing the same intersections and unions of specs

when we have already done the job. This is efficient if

the underlying (delegate) specs are easily compared,

which is the case thanks to the interning factory.

All in all, the delegation chain allows us to make

the algorithm fast and hopefully reliable, while

making it easier to debug.

    • -818
    • +0
    ./DefaultModuleExclusionTest.groovy
  1. … 75 more files in changeset.
Rework exclude rule merging

As a follow-up to #9197, this commit properly fixes the

exclude rule merging algorithm, by completely rewriting

it. The new merging algorithm works by implementing the

minimal set of algebra operations that make sense to

minimize computation durations. In order to do this,

this commit introduces a number of exclude specs

(found in their own package) and factories to create

actual implementation of those specs.

Specs represent the different kind of excludes we can

find:

- excluding a group

- excluding a module (no group defined)

- excluding a group+module

- excluding an artifact of a group+module

- pattern-matching excludes

- unions of excludes

- intersections of excludes

With all those minimal bricks, factories are responsible

of generating consistent specs. The dumbest factory

will just generate new instances for everything. This

is the default factory.

Minimally, this factory has to be backed by an optimizing

factory, which will take care of handling special cases:

- union or intersection of a single spec

- union or intersection of 2 specs

- when one of them is null

- when both are equal

Then we have a factory which performs the minimal algebra

to minimize specs:

- unions of unions

- intersections of intersections

- union of a union and individual specs

- insection of an intersection and individual spec

- ...

This factory can be as smart as it can, but one must be

careful that it's worth it: some previously implemented

optimizations (like (A+B).A = A turned out to be costly

to detect, and didn't make it the final cut.

Yet another factory is there to reduce the memory footprint

and, as a side effect, make things faster by interning

the specs: equivalent specs are interned and indexed, which

allows us to optimize unions and intersections of specs.

Last but not least, a caching factory is there to avoid

recomputing the same intersections and unions of specs

when we have already done the job. This is efficient if

the underlying (delegate) specs are easily compared,

which is the case thanks to the interning factory.

All in all, the delegation chain allows us to make

the algorithm fast and hopefully reliable, while

making it easier to debug.

    • -818
    • +0
    ./DefaultModuleExclusionTest.groovy
  1. … 90 more files in changeset.
Rework exclude rule merging

As a follow-up to #9197, this commit properly fixes the

exclude rule merging algorithm, by completely rewriting

it. The new merging algorithm works by implementing the

minimal set of algebra operations that make sense to

minimize computation durations. In order to do this,

this commit introduces a number of exclude specs

(found in their own package) and factories to create

actual implementation of those specs.

Specs represent the different kind of excludes we can

find:

- excluding a group

- excluding a module (no group defined)

- excluding a group+module

- excluding an artifact of a group+module

- pattern-matching excludes

- unions of excludes

- intersections of excludes

With all those minimal bricks, factories are responsible

of generating consistent specs. The dumbest factory

will just generate new instances for everything. This

is the default factory.

Minimally, this factory has to be backed by an optimizing

factory, which will take care of handling special cases:

- union or intersection of a single spec

- union or intersection of 2 specs

- when one of them is null

- when both are equal

Then we have a factory which performs the minimal algebra

to minimize specs:

- unions of unions

- intersections of intersections

- union of a union and individual specs

- insection of an intersection and individual spec

- ...

This factory can be as smart as it can, but one must be

careful that it's worth it: some previously implemented

optimizations (like (A+B).A = A turned out to be costly

to detect, and didn't make it the final cut.

Yet another factory is there to reduce the memory footprint

and, as a side effect, make things faster by interning

the specs: equivalent specs are interned and indexed, which

allows us to optimize unions and intersections of specs.

Last but not least, a caching factory is there to avoid

recomputing the same intersections and unions of specs

when we have already done the job. This is efficient if

the underlying (delegate) specs are easily compared,

which is the case thanks to the interning factory.

All in all, the delegation chain allows us to make

the algorithm fast and hopefully reliable, while

making it easier to debug.

    • -818
    • +0
    ./DefaultModuleExclusionTest.groovy
  1. … 90 more files in changeset.
Rework exclude rule merging

As a follow-up to #9197, this commit properly fixes the

exclude rule merging algorithm, by completely rewriting

it. The new merging algorithm works by implementing the

minimal set of algebra operations that make sense to

minimize computation durations. In order to do this,

this commit introduces a number of exclude specs

(found in their own package) and factories to create

actual implementation of those specs.

Specs represent the different kind of excludes we can

find:

- excluding a group

- excluding a module (no group defined)

- excluding a group+module

- excluding an artifact of a group+module

- pattern-matching excludes

- unions of excludes

- intersections of excludes

With all those minimal bricks, factories are responsible

of generating consistent specs. The dumbest factory

will just generate new instances for everything. This

is the default factory.

Minimally, this factory has to be backed by an optimizing

factory, which will take care of handling special cases:

- union or intersection of a single spec

- union or intersection of 2 specs

- when one of them is null

- when both are equal

Then we have a factory which performs the minimal algebra

to minimize specs:

- unions of unions

- intersections of intersections

- union of a union and individual specs

- insection of an intersection and individual spec

- ...

This factory can be as smart as it can, but one must be

careful that it's worth it: some previously implemented

optimizations (like (A+B).A = A turned out to be costly

to detect, and didn't make it the final cut.

Yet another factory is there to reduce the memory footprint

and, as a side effect, make things faster by interning

the specs: equivalent specs are interned and indexed, which

allows us to optimize unions and intersections of specs.

Last but not least, a caching factory is there to avoid

recomputing the same intersections and unions of specs

when we have already done the job. This is efficient if

the underlying (delegate) specs are easily compared,

which is the case thanks to the interning factory.

All in all, the delegation chain allows us to make

the algorithm fast and hopefully reliable, while

making it easier to debug.

    • -818
    • +0
    ./DefaultModuleExclusionTest.groovy
  1. … 90 more files in changeset.
Rework exclude rule merging

As a follow-up to #9197, this commit properly fixes the

exclude rule merging algorithm, by completely rewriting

it. The new merging algorithm works by implementing the

minimal set of algebra operations that make sense to

minimize computation durations. In order to do this,

this commit introduces a number of exclude specs

(found in their own package) and factories to create

actual implementation of those specs.

Specs represent the different kind of excludes we can

find:

- excluding a group

- excluding a module (no group defined)

- excluding a group+module

- excluding an artifact of a group+module

- pattern-matching excludes

- unions of excludes

- intersections of excludes

With all those minimal bricks, factories are responsible

of generating consistent specs. The dumbest factory

will just generate new instances for everything. This

is the default factory.

Minimally, this factory has to be backed by an optimizing

factory, which will take care of handling special cases:

- union or intersection of a single spec

- union or intersection of 2 specs

- when one of them is null

- when both are equal

Then we have a factory which performs the minimal algebra

to minimize specs:

- unions of unions

- intersections of intersections

- union of a union and individual specs

- insection of an intersection and individual spec

- ...

This factory can be as smart as it can, but one must be

careful that it's worth it: some previously implemented

optimizations (like (A+B).A = A turned out to be costly

to detect, and didn't make it the final cut.

Yet another factory is there to reduce the memory footprint

and, as a side effect, make things faster by interning

the specs: equivalent specs are interned and indexed, which

allows us to optimize unions and intersections of specs.

Last but not least, a caching factory is there to avoid

recomputing the same intersections and unions of specs

when we have already done the job. This is efficient if

the underlying (delegate) specs are easily compared,

which is the case thanks to the interning factory.

All in all, the delegation chain allows us to make

the algorithm fast and hopefully reliable, while

making it easier to debug.

    • -818
    • +0
    ./DefaultModuleExclusionTest.groovy
  1. … 90 more files in changeset.
Clarifying renames

The exclude rule merging algorithms are pretty hard to understand

due to the mental shift required by weird definitions of "union"

and "intersection" which are the exact opposite of what they should

be.

    • -83
    • +83
    ./DefaultModuleExclusionTest.groovy
  1. … 8 more files in changeset.
Clarifying renames

The exclude rule merging algorithms are pretty hard to understand

due to the mental shift required by weird definitions of "union"

and "intersection" which are the exact opposite of what they should

be.

    • -83
    • +83
    ./DefaultModuleExclusionTest.groovy
  1. … 8 more files in changeset.
Make `DefaultExclude.artifacts` nullable

Use `null` value for exclude that doesn't exclude artifacts

This is likely more efficient that the existing wildcard match,

and more consistent with other wildcard matches.

    • -14
    • +25
    ./DefaultModuleExclusionTest.groovy
  1. … 10 more files in changeset.
Cache id, name and group exclusions to enable faster merging

This commit adds a cache for id, name and group exclusion specs. This allows faster merging because comparisons will more likely

fall into `==` instead of relying on `equals`.

  1. … 1 more file in changeset.
Make use of the module identifier factory in `ModuleExclusions`

  1. … 1 more file in changeset.
Turn `ModuleExclusions` into a build scoped service

    • -7
    • +13
    ./DefaultModuleExclusionTest.groovy
  1. … 53 more files in changeset.
Fix unit tests

  1. … 2 more files in changeset.
Revert De-duplicate commonly used immutable objects in dependency resolution and IDE changes

Commits reverted:

- 807b1e4f8d1585d93c1de3e9ca83d99d0819e2d2

- 9482b0b05374253cafdb776550d7016385912e04

- 4ecead06b53ec6b0f15c517bf0d0c6a74c3b3c05

- db1135a8a5f1c507e0df3c03ad12ddc963799e4d

- 7350bcbae30a777909cec74ebfd5a91d2c89081e

Additionally, minor changes to avoid usage of introduced

classes and methods from subsequent commits.

Issue: gradle/gradle-private#563

  1. … 109 more files in changeset.
De-duplicate (= intern) some instances in dependency resolution

- Reduce memory usage of dependency resolution by de-duplicating the

most commonly used immutable instances.

- Objects aren't strictly immutable: displayName is calculated lazily

- solution is thread-safe without synchronization

- lazy calculation is needed for efficient interning since a lookup

will always create a new instance.

- Use strong references in some instance interners

- strong references cause less GC overhead than weak references

- Strong references:

DefaultModuleIdentifier

DefaultModuleVersionIdentifier

DefaultModuleVersionSelector

DefaultModuleComponentIdentifier

DefaultModuleComponentSelector

DefaultProjectComponentSelector

- Weak references:

DefaultLibraryBinaryIdentifier

DefaultLibraryComponentSelector

DefaultIvyArtifactName

- Both reference types:

DefaultBuildIdentifier

DefaultProjectComponentIdentifier

- The reason for special handing is that DefaultBuildIdentifier

has a state field "current" as part of the instance which

isn't part of equals/hashCode.

+review REVIEW-6277

  1. … 104 more files in changeset.
Changed `ModuleExclusions.intersection()` and `union()` so that when the 2 provided specs are equal, return one of the original specs, rather than unpacking and recreating.

This deals with the case where a set of exclusions travel through many edges in the graph, for example when exclusions are attached to a `Configuration` being resolved.

    • -22
    • +85
    ./DefaultModuleExclusionTest.groovy
  1. … 1 more file in changeset.
Renamed `MultipleExcludeRulesFilter` -> `IntersectionExclusion`

  1. … 4 more files in changeset.
Renamed `ModuleExcludeRuleFilter` -> `ModuleExclusion`

    • -0
    • +735
    ./DefaultModuleExclusionTest.groovy
  1. … 23 more files in changeset.